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Just published: Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices

Friedewald, M.; van Lieshout, M.; Rung, S. (2016): Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 476), S. 1-18.

The relationship between privacy and security is often but falsely understood as a zero-sum game, whereby more security can only be achieved by sacrifice of privacy. Since this has been proven as too simplistic this chapter explores what factors are influencing people’s perceptions of privacy and security in the context of security-oriented surveillance practices. We are presenting a model showing that structural elements such as trust in the institutions that are implementing and operating surveillance systems are crucial for the acceptability while individual factors such as age, gender or region of living are less important than often assumed.

The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) survey data now publicly available

Now available in GESIS – Data Archive for the Social Sciences: Survey  Data from the project “The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making” under number ZA6296.

Primary researchers of this study are:
Szekely, Iván, Eötvös Károly Policy Institute
Raab, Charles, University Edinburgh
van der Ploeg, Irma, University Maastricht
Gutwirth, Serge, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
Wright, David, Trilateral Research Ltd.
van Lieshout, Marc, Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research
Skinner, Gideon, Ipsos MORI
Friedewald, Michael, Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

Dataset: 1.0.0 (01.07.2016) doi:10.4232/1.12559

Access class: A – Data and documents are released for academic research and teaching.

More information is available at the data catalogue: study description.

Suggested citation:

Friedewald, Michael; Skinner, Gideon; van Lieshout, Marc; Wright, David; Gutwirth, Serge; van der Ploeg, Irma; Raab, Charles; Szekely, Iván (2016): The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making. GESIS Datenarchiv, Köln. ZA6296 Datenfile Version 1.0.0, doi:10.4232/1.12559

The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) Umfragedaten jetzt öffentlich verfügbar

Neu im GESIS – Datenarchiv für Sozialwissenschaften verfügbar sind die Daten der Studie „The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making“ unter der Nummer ZA6296.

Primärforscher dieser Studie sind:
Szekely, Iván, Eötvös Károly Policy Institute
Raab, Charles, University Edinburgh
van der Ploeg, Irma, University Maastricht
Gutwirth, Serge, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
Wright, David, Trilateral Research Ltd.
van Lieshout, Marc, Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research
Skinner, Gideon, Ipsos MORI
Friedewald, Michael, Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

Datensatz: 1.0.0 (01.07.2016) doi:10.4232/1.12559

Zugangsklasse: A – Daten und Dokumente sind für die akademische Forschung und Lehre freigegeben.

Weitere Informationen im Datenbestandskatalog: Studienbeschreibung.

Suggested citation:

Friedewald, Michael; Skinner, Gideon; van Lieshout, Marc; Wright, David; Gutwirth, Serge; van der Ploeg, Irma; Raab, Charles; Szekely, Iván (2016): The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making. GESIS Datenarchiv, Köln. ZA6296 Datenfile Version 1.0.0, doi:10.4232/1.12559

2 neue Studien zur Sicherheit in „Smart Cities“ im Auftrag von ENISA

Lévy-Bencheton, Cédric, Eleni Darra, Daniel Bachlechner, Michael Friedewald, Timothy Mitchener-Nissen, Monica Lagazio, and Antonio Kung, Cyber security for Smart Cities: An architecture model for public transport, European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA), Heraklion, 2015.

The main objective of this study is to model the architecture of the transport sector in SCs and to describe good cyber security practices of IPT operators. The good practices are put into a relationship with different city maturity levels. This allows representatives of operators and municipalities to quickly assess whether or not they lag behind other cities with the same maturity level in terms of cyber security and, if so, to take appropriate actions. The study is primarily focused on the provision of practical, hands-on guidance.

Lévy-Bencheton, Cédric, Eleni Darra, Timothy Mitchener-Nissen, Monica Lagazio, Daniel Bachlechner, Michael Friedewald, and Antonio Kung, Cyber Security and Resilience of Intelligent Public Transport: Good practices and recommendations, European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA), Heraklion, 2015.

This study proposes a pragmatic approach that will highlight the critical assets of Intelligent Public Transport systems. It gives an overview of the existing security measures (good practices) that could be deployed to protect these critical assets and ensure security of the IPT system, based on a survey and interviews of experts from the sector, municipalities, operators, manufacturers and policy makers.

Just published: „Factors influencing citizens’ attitudes towards surveillance oriented security technologies“

Friedewald, Michael, and Marc van Lieshout, „Factors influencing citizens’ attitudes towards surveillance oriented security technologies„, in Constanze Scherz, Tomáš Michalek, Leonhard Hennen, Lenka Hebáková, Julia Hahn, and Stefanie Seitz (eds.), The Next Horizon of Technology Assessment: Proceedings from the PACITA 2015 Conference in Berlin, Technology Centre ASCR, Prague, 2015, pp. 259-264.

New article: Civilizing drones: Military discourses going civil

Braun, Sven, Michael Friedewald, and Govert Valkenburg, „Civilizing drones: Military discourses going civil„, Science & Technology Studies, Vol. 28, No. 2, 2015, pp. 73-87.

This article presents an account of how a technology being transferred from one area of deployment to another entails that specific discourses travel along. In particular, we show that the development of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS, often referred to as drones) is importantly determined by its military progeny, as the civilian context inherits specific discourses from the military context. Contemporary ideas of privacy and security in drone use can be largely traced back to this original context. We show that concepts and their relative importance primarily depend on the discourses that travel together with the technologies on which the concepts aim to act. There is no technological reason for privacy and security to be implemented the way they are, nor can their implementation be explained merely from socio-political or moral discourses. Instead, material and discursive mechanisms successfully enact and reproduce the dominant military viewpoint.

Just published: Privacy and Security Perceptions of European Citizens: A Test of the Trade-off Model

Friedewald, Michael, Marc van Lieshout, Sven Rung, Merel Ooms, and Jelmer Ypma, „Privacy and Security Perceptions of European Citizens: A Test of the Trade-off Model„, in Jan Camenisch, Simone Fischer-Hübner, and Marit Hansen (eds.), Privacy and Identity Management for the Future Internet in the Age of Globalisation: 9th IFIP WG 9.2, 9.5, 9.6/11.7, 11.4, 11.6/SIG 9.2.2 International Summer School, Patras, Greece, September 7-12, 2014, Revised Selected Papers, Springer, Heidelberg, Berlin, 2015, pp. 39-53. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-18621-4_4

This paper considers the relationship between privacy and security and, in particular, the traditional ”trade-off” paradigm that argues that citizens might be willing to sacrifice some privacy for more security. Academics have long argued against the trade-off paradigm, but these arguments have often fallen on deaf ears. Based on data gathered in a pan-European survey we show that both privacy and security are important to European citizens and that there is no significant correlation between people’s valuation of privacy and security.