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Final EVITA Workshop on Security of Automotive On-Board Networks

23 November 2011, Honda Academy in Erlensee, Germany

In order to present major results of the project to the public, the EVITA consortium holds a Workshop on Security of Automotive On-Board Networks. The workshop takes place before the Car 2 Car Forum 2011 at the Honda Academy in Erlensee (near Frankfurt/Main, Germany). After presenting the main points of the specifications of the security building blocks, the consortium shows desktop and vehicle demonstrators for various automotive applications that require security measures.

EVITA at Car 2 Car Forum 2011

24-25 November 2011, Honda Academy in Erlensee, Germany

Desktop and vehicle demonstrators of the EVITA project are part of the exhibition of the Car 2 Car Forum 2011 at the Honda Academy in Erlensee (near Frankfurt/Main, Germany). The demonstrators show various automotive applications that require security measures. Results of the EVITA project will also be presented in a plenary session. The Car 2 Car Forum is the annual forum for members of the Car 2 Car Communication Consortium.

CONTECS CONverging TEChnologies and their impact on the Social sciences and humanities

This project addresses the potential roles that the social sciences and humanities (SSH) can play with regard to the phenomenon of technological convergence (between Nano-, Bio-, Information technologies, Cognitive sciences and Social sciences and Humanities), its shaping and ethical and societal implications.

In an integrated and systemic approach the project explores the major ethical and societal questions raised by technological development in the field of converging technologies (CT) and the ways in which these can be addressed by the Social Sciences and Humanities. In the context of imminent transformations to a European knowledge-based society, these questions present key opportunities and challenges which the research community needs to be prepared to face. This research project will build on a review and monitoring of technological developments in the CTs and relevant global RTD policy trends, at the same time analysing their possible implications for contributions by the SSH.

The project will further analyse how and to what extent the SSH can contribute to the shaping of science and technology. The final aim is to raise awareness of Converging Technology issues throughout the SSH community and to develop options for a research agenda to be implemented in the SSH priority of the 7th Framework Program. The emergence of the knowledge-based society will entail new forms of relationships between its citizens on the one hand, and between its citizens and institutions on the other hand. The project aims to mobilise European research capacities in SSH that are necessary to develop an understanding of and to address issues related to this critical phenomenon.

Status

Completed (02/2006 – 01/2008)

Client

6th Framework Programme, European Commission, DG Research, Directorate K

Partners

  • Research Centre Karlsruhe, Institute for Technology Assessment and Systems Analysis (ITAS)
  • University Oxford, Saïd Business School
  • L’Institut de l’Ecole normale supérieure

Publications

Articles and book chapters

  • Rader, Michael, “CONverging TECnologies and their impact on the Social sciences and humanities (CONTECS)”, Technikfolgenabschätzung – Theorie und Praxis, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2006, pp. 139.
  • Coenen, Christopher, “Converging Technologies – Promises and Challenges”, Technikfolgenabschätzung – Theorie und Praxis, Vol. 15, No. 1, 2006, pp. 110-114.
  • Quendt, Christiane, Torsten Fleischer, and Michael Rader, “Converging Technologies als Gegenstand internationaler forschungspolitischer Debatten – Beoachtungen, Analysen, Probleme”, Paper presented at: Technology Assessment in World Society: NTA2 – Second conference of the “TA Network”, Berlin, 2006.
  • Beckert, Bernd, Clemens Blümel, and Michael Friedewald, “Visions and Realities in Converging Technologies: Exploring the technology base for convergence”, Innovation: The European Journal of Social Science Research, Vol. 20, No. 4, 2007, pp. 375-394.
  • Coenen, Christopher, “Utopian Aspects of the Debate on Converging Technologies”, in Gerhard Banse, Imre  Hronszky, and G.  Nelson (eds.), Converging Technologies. Promises and Challenges, Sigma, Berlin, 2007.
  • Coenen, Christopher, “Konvergierende Technologien und Wissenschaften. Der Stand der Debatte und politischen Aktivitäten zu »Converging Technologies«”, Hintergrundpapier 16, Büro für Technikfolgen-Abschätzung beim Deutschen Bundestag, Berlin, 2008.
  • Fleischer, Torsten, Christiane Quendt, and Michael Rader, “Converging Technologies und die Sozial- und Geisteswissenschaften: Ergebnisse und Erfahrungen aus einem EU-Projekt”, Technikfolgenabschätzung – Theorie und Praxis, Vol. 17, No. 2, 2008, pp. 74-77.
  • Beckert, Bernd, Clemens Blümel, and Michael Friedewald, “Kje danes prihaja do tehnološke konvergence? Identifikacija področij interdisciplinarnih zahtev in vplivov na znastveni in technološki razvoj”, Casopis za kritiko znanosti, domišljijo in antropologijo (Journal for the Criticism of Science, Imagination and New Anthropology), Vol. 37, No. 237, 2009, pp. 43-55.

Official deliverables

  • Andler, Daniel, and Vincent Pargade, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS). Cognitive science within Convergence: A first attempt at delineating the field in Europe”, Deliverable D1.1 – Part B, Fraunhofer ISI, Karlsruhe, 2006.
  • Woolgar, Steve, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS). Visions and Discourse in Converging Technologies: a background report”, Deliverable D1.2, University Oxford, Said Business School, Oxford, 2006.
  • Rader, Michael, Christopher Coenen, Torsten Fleischer, Beate-Josefine Luber, and Christiane Quendt, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS): Current trends in RTD policy on Converging Technologies “, Deliverable D1.3, Research Center Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 2006.
  • Andler, Daniel, and Simon Barthelmé, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS). Cognitive science within Convergence: Key issues in the European Context”, Deliverable D3.1 – Part B, Institut de l’École normale supérieure, Paris, 2007.
  • Beckert, Bernd, Clemens Blümel, Michael Friedewald, and Axel Thielmann, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS): R&D Trends in Converging Technologies “, Deliverable D3.1 – Part A, Fraunhofer ISI, Karlsruhe, 2007.
  • Woolgar, Steve, Christopher Coenen, and Elena Simakova, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS). The Ontological Politics of Convergence”, Deliverable D3.2, University Oxford, Said Business School, Oxford, 2007.
  • Rader, Michael, Christopher Coenen, Torsten Fleischer, Beate-Josefine Luber, and Christiane Quendt, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS): Current trends in RTD policy on Converging Technologies “, Deliverable D3.3, Research Center Karlsruhe, Karlsruhe, 2007.
  • Andler, Daniel, Simon Barthelmé, Bernd Beckert, Clemens Blümel, Christopher Coenen, Torsten Fleischer, Michael Friedewald, Christiane Quendt, Michael Rader, Elena Simakova, and Steve Woolgar, “Converging technologies and their impact on the social sciences and humanities (CONTECS): An Analysis of critical issues and a suggestion for a future research agenda”, Final Report 2008.

Basic Research and Innovative Science for Energy (BRISE)

Background

Since numerous radical technological changes brought about the energy technology revolutions of mid 19th century, technology in energy sector has experienced notable progresses but mainly as incremental improvements of well-established technological paradigms and not as radical changes in the basic schemes followed for the provision of energy services.

Solving short-term energy-related problems by fine-tuning existing technologies is not sufficient and may not work out in the future due to the exponential growth of energy demand. Since a stabilisation of this demand seems to be unrealistic, it is essential to analyse how energy progress could shift from incremental progress toward radical changes. For instance, high potential technologies like carbon-free electricity, bio-fuels or hydrogen/fuel cell might become radical technologies if they receive further developments from basic research discoveries.

The key idea of the project was based on the fact that purely incremental progress will not suffice to provide the knowledge and technologies needed to address the daunting challenges ahead of us in terms of availability and affordability of clean energy. Therefore a combination of breakthroughs in the provision and use of energy, tapping the potential of basic science, multidisciplinary approaches and cross-cutting technologies were required. However, lessons from various attempts made in Europe and outside seem to show that “science mining” to identify results or discoveries with application potential for energy does not automatically work. The idea was therefore to use a “reverse methodology” based on the identification of the main bottlenecks for which technologies breakthroughs are needed. For these bottlenecks possible solutions were determined offered by the area of fundamental science and basic research. With respect to the emerging technologies to be identified here we concentrated on nanotechnology, biotechnology and information and communication technology.

Objective

The goal of this study was to support the European Commission in developing a programme of basic research activities that stimulate major breakthroughs within the energy sector (energy primary sources and transformation). The specific objectives of this study  consist of the two following points:

  1. identify the major breakthroughs and potentials in the energy field (excluding nuclear);
  2. determine, through a multidisciplinary approach, what are the basic research needs to stimulate these breakthroughs.

This analysis provided relevant recommendations on basic research potentials that were used for the definition of priorities in energy research.

Method and approach

The work was built on the earlier project “ESTIR Energy Scientific & Technological Indicators and References”. The results of this project were revisited and adapted as an essential basis for the background documentation.

A first step was to extract the main issues with relevance to fundamental and basic research from the ESTIR project on the one hand and possible applicability to energy conversion processes on the on the other hand. In a second step the document (REF) that has been extracted from the results of the ESTIR project was complemented by additional information from other sources and expert views.

Based on this background elaborated in by desk research one workshops was held in order to validate and further develop the initial background document. The final result of the project was an approach to tap the potential of fundamental science for the research and development needs of the energy sector.

Status

Completed project (June 2006 – December 2007)

Client

European Commission, Joint Research Centers, Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS)

Partners

  • GeorgiaTech, Technology Policy and Assessment Centre (TPAC)
  • BSR Sustainability GmbH

Publication

Official deliverables

  • Ragwitz, Mario, Michael Friedewald, Sibylle Gaisser, Axel Thielmann, Marilyn Brown, Susan Cozzens, and Felipe Andrés Toro, “Basic Research and Innovative Science for Energy”, BRISE Deliverable 5, European Techno-Economic Policy Support Network (ETEPS), Brussels, 2008.

Conference on safeguards in a world of ambient intelligence

EuroVillage Hotel, Brussels, 21-22 March 2006

Announcement

SWAMI (Safeguards in a World of AMbient Intelligence) team is organizing a conference on Safeguards in Ambient Intelligence, to be held in Brussels, 21-22 March 2006. The purpose of this conference is to explore policy options related to safeguards for privacy, security, trust, identity and digital divide.

While AmI enthusiasts foresee a future information society where the emphasis is on greater user-friendliness, more efficient services, user empowerment and support for human interactions, we know well that the adoption rate of ambient intelligence environments will depend on how secure it can be made, how privacy and other rights of individuals can be protected and how individuals can come to trust the intelligent world that surrounds them and through which they move. So policy options need be defined and put in place to facilitate the creation of AmI environments.

The SWAMI project aims to identify and analyse the social, economic, legal, technological and ethical issues related to identity, privacy and security in the forecasted but not yet deployed Ambient Intelligence (AmI) environment. The intention is thus to identify and propose adequate policy measures so as to help enhance the adoption of the technologies by the citizens.

The rate of adoption of AmI by citizens will depend on how secure it can be made, how privacy and other rights of individuals can be protected and how individuals can come to trust the intelligent world that surrounds them and through which they move. That, in a nutshell, is the aim of the conference.

Conference Programme

This programme includes agenda, abstracts of contributions and list of participants

 *** see final version (19/03/2006) ***

SWAMI Work Packages

Work package 1 (WP1) consists of a state of the art review of existing AmI projects, studies, scenarios and roadmaps.

Description

  1. To provide a state-of-the-art overview of the key social, legal, economic, technological and ethical implications with regard to identity, privacy and security of Ambient Intelligence as developed in existing scenario exercises, IST roadmaps and projects.
  2. To convene a workshop with selected AmI experts to validate the review and to identify the main factors for the scenario development.
    SWAMI First Workshop with external exports was held in Brussels, on 1 June 2005:
    See Workshop Background document.
    It is a preliminary analysis of scenarios and visions on AmI and contains also a first analysis of the legal framework related to AmI.
    See Workshop Minutes
    See Workshop Slides:

    1. Introduction to SWAMI and Objectives of Workshop – Michael Friedewald
    2. Review of Scenarios: the Analytical Framework – Elena Vildjiounaite & Petteri Alahuhta
    3. First Analysis of AmI Scenarios – Elena Vildjiounaite & Petteri Alahuhta
    4. Preparing for “dark” scenarios on AmI – Yves Punie & Ioannis Maghiros
    5. First results of the legal analysis – Serge Gutwirth, Wim Schreurs & Michiel Verlinden
    6. Threats in future AmI Applications: First evidence – Michael Friedewald

Deliverable

Work package 2 (WP2) deals with developing “dark” (adverse) scenarios, the aim of which will be to expose key socio-economic, legal, technological and ethical risks and vulnerabilities related to issues such as identity, privacy and security.

Description

  1. To construct four dark AmI scenarios, i.e., which highlight the risks and vulnerabilities with regard to identity, privacy, security etc, together with a first impact assessment on the social, economic, legal, technological and ethical implications.
  2. To convene an internal consortium meeting for in-depth discussion and elaboration of scenarios.

Here is the scenario deliverable:

Dark scenarios in ambient intelligence: Highlighting risks and vulnerabilities. Deliverable D2, Final version, January 2006

The report contains four scenarios:

  • Dark scenario 1: A typical family in different environments – presents AmI vulnerabilities in the life of a typical family moving through different environments. It introduces dark situations in the smart home, at work and while taking a lunch break in a park.
  • Dark scenario 2: Seniors on a journey – also references a family but focuses more specifically on senior citizens on a bus tour. An exploited vulnerability in the traffic system causes an accident, raising many different problems related to both travel and health AmI systems.
  • Dark scenario 3: Corporate boardroom & court case – takes a different stance, involving a data-aggregating company that becomes victim of theft of the personal data which fuel its core business. Given its dominant position in the market, the company wants to cover this up but will face the courtroom two years later.
  • Dark scenario 4: Risk society – suggests AmI as risk society portrayed from the studios of a morning news programme. It presents an action group against personalised profiling; the digital divide at a global scale and related to environmental concerns; the possible vulnerabilities of AmI traffic systems and crowd management in an AmI environment.

Equally important as the scenario stories is the scenario analysis. The SWAMI scenario analysis contains:

  • A short summary of the major dark situations mentioned in the scenario story;
  • A list of the most important AmI technologies and/or devices used and/or implied in the scenarios.
  • A list of major AmI applications that emerge in each scenario. Applications allow certain things to be done with the technologies and devices;
  • The drivers that have led to the scenarios and/or their (dark) situations.
  • A discussion of the major issues in terms of privacy, security, identity and vulnerabilities raised by the scenario, which are the core concerns of the SWAMI project;
  • The legal aspects implicit in the scenarios;
  • Preliminary conclusions.

The SWAMI scenarios also consist of a “technology check”, i.e. references to RTD projects and publications and a “reality check”, i.e. references to recent news reports. Although the scenarios are to be regarded as fictional, they need to be credible and realistic as to achieve their aim, i.e. highlighting vulnerabilities and weaknesses in order to develop safeguards.

Work package 3 (WP3) develops legal and policy options which could serve as safeguards and privacy-enhancing mechanisms for Ambient Intelligence.

Description

  1. To formulate and consider how and to what extent it is possible or could be possible in the future to overcome the problematic implications of the dark side of AmI, e.g., through the use of various safeguards and privacy enhancing mechanisms (PEMs), the aim of which is to ensure user control and enforceability of policy in an accessible manner and the protection of rights for all citizens in all their roles (private and professional) in the Information Society.
  2. To convene a second workshop of AmI experts in order to have their comments / validation of a range of safeguards and privacy-enhancing mechanisms.

Deliverable

 Threats, Vulnerabilities and Safeguards in Ambient Intelligence. Deliverable D3. July 2006

After the introduction (chapter 1), the report is structured as follows:

  • Chapter 2 gives an overview of the five key areas that have been addressed in our analysis
    of threats and vulnerabilities in a world of ambient intelligence, namely individual privacy,
    identity, trust, security and the risks of digital divides. These sections discuss the main
    goals that safeguards seek to achieve, the challenges that ambient intelligence bears for
    attaining them and the conflict between some goals.
  • Chapter 3 details the threats and vulnerabilities in each of the areas. Taking into account
    the four dark scenarios developed in the second SWAMI report, a small number of generic
    problems are identified that require the formulation of suitable safeguards.
  • Chapter 4 presents and discusses approaches for technical, socio-economic, legal and
    regulatory, and cultural safeguards that are considered in order to address one or more of
    the problems mentioned before.
  • Chapter 5 concludes the report by presenting recommendations for various groups of
    stakeholders, ranging from the European Commission and industry to civil society
    organisations and the individual citizen.

 Work package 4 (WP4) focusses on dissimination of project results, continuously throughout the project. There are two validation and awareness-raising workshops foreseen. A final conference at the end of the project is also planned.

Description

  1. To prepare the final report of the project.
  2. To convene a Final Conference, at which the final report will be presented.
  3. To carry out dissemination activities.

Deliverable

 Final Report . Deliverable D4. August 2006

SWAMI Partners

Short nameInstitution & ContactWebsite & E-mail
ISI (Project Co-ordinator)Fraunhofer Institute Systems and Innovation Research (Germany)

Michael Friedewald
Ralf Lindner
www.isi.fraunhofer.de

m.friedewald@isi.fraunhofer.de
r.lindner@isi.fraunhofer.de
IPTSInstitute for Prospective Technological Studies,
DG-JRC, European Commission (Spain)

Ioannis Maghiros
Yves Punie
Sabine Delaitre
www.jrc.es

ioannis.maghiros@cec.eu.int
yves.punie@cec.eu.int
sabine.delaitre@cec.eu.int
VUB LSTSVrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

Serge Gutwirth
Wim Schreurs
Michiel Verlinden
Anna Moscibroda
www.vub.ac.be/LSTS

serge.gutwirth@vub.ac.be
wim.schreurs@vub.ac.be
michiel.verlinden@vub.ac.be
p.j.a.dehert@law.leidenuniv.nl
VTTTechnical Research Centre of Finland,
VTT Electronics (Finland)

Petteri Alahuhta
Heikki Ailisto
Elena Vildjiounaite
www.vtt.fi

Petteri.Alahuhta@vtt.fi
Heikki.Ailisto@vtt.fi
TrilateralTrilateral Research & Consulting (UK)

David Wright
www.trilateralresearch.com

david.wright@trilateralresearch.com

Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence – SWAMI

Project Summary

Objective: This project aims to identify and analyse the social, economic, legal, technological and ethical issues related to identity, privacy and security in the forecasted but not yet deployed Ambient Intelligence (AmI) environment.

FP6 Project: IST Priority 8.1: Policy-oriented research (SSP): Integrating and Strengthening the European Research Area.
Start date of contract: 1 February 2005
Contract duration: 18 Months

SWAMI Partners

Work Packages

Final Conference

Deliverables

    • Friedewald, Michael, Elena Vildjiounaite, David Wright, Ioannis Maghiros, Michiel Verlinden, Petteri Alahuhta, Sabine Delaitre, Serge Gutwirth, Wim Schreurs, and Yves Punie, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence (SWAMI): The brave new world of ambient intelligence – A state-of-the-art review”, Deliverable D1, January 2006.
    • Punie, Yves, Sabine Delaitre, Ioannis Maghiros, David Wright, Michael Friedewald, Petteri Alahuhta, Serge Gutwirth, Paul de Hert, Ralf Lindner, Anna Agata Moscibroda, Wim Schreurs, Michiel Verlinden, and Elena Vildjiounaite, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence (SWAMI): Dark Scenarios on Ambient Intelligence – Higlighting risks and vulnerabilities”, Deliverable D2, January 2006.
    • Friedewald, Michael, Ralf Lindner, David Wright, Pasi Ahonen, Petteri Alahuhta, Barbara Daskala, Paul de Hert, Sabine Delaitre, Serge Gutwirth, Ioannis Maghiros, Anna Agata Moscibroda, Yves Punie, Wim Schreurs, Elena Vildjiounaite, and David  Wright, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence (SWAMI): Threats, Vulnerabilities and Safeguards in Ambient Intelligence”, Deliverable D3, 2006.
    • Wright, David, Michael Friedewald, Pasi Ahonen, Petteri Alahuhta, Barbara Daskala, Paul de Hert, Sabine Delaitre, Serge Gutwirth, Ralf Lindner, Ioannis Maghiros, Anna Agata Moscibroda, Yves Punie, Wim Schreurs, Michiel Verlinden, and Elena Vildjiounaite, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence (SWAMI): Final Report”, Deliverable 4, 2006.
    • Friedewald, Michael, and David Wright, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence (SWAMI): Report on the Final Conference, Brussels, 21-22 March 2006”, Deliverable D5, 2006.
    • Wright, David, and Michael Friedewald, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence (SWAMI): Report on Dissemination Activities”, Deliverable D6, 2006.

Book

    • Wright, David, Serge Gutwirth, Michael Friedewald, Elena Vildjiounaite, and Yves Punie, Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence, Springer, Dordrecht, 2008.

Articles

  • Friedewald, Michael, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence: Outline of a research agenda on the European Level”, in Dieter Hutter, and Markus Ullmann (eds.), Security in Pervasive Computing. Proceedings of the second International Conference, SPC 2005, Boppard, Germany, April 6-8, 2005, Springer, Heidelberg, Berlin, 2005, pp. 63-69.
  • Wright, David, “The dark side of ambient intelligence”, Info: The journal of policy, regulation and strategy, Vol. 7, No. 6, 2005, pp. 33-51.
  • Friedewald, Michael, Olivier Da Costa, Yves Punie, Petteri Alahuhta, and Sirkka Heinonen, “Perspectives of Ambient Intelligence in the Home Environment”, Telematics and Informatics, Vol. 22, No. 3, 2005, pp. 221-238.
  • Maghiros, Ioannis, Yves Punie, Sabine Delaitre, Paul de Hert, Serge Gutwirth, Wim Schreurs, Anna Agata Moscibroda, Michael Friedewald, Ralf Lindner, David Wright, Elena Vildjiounaite, and Petteri Alahuhta, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence”, in Achilles D. Kameas, and Dimitris Papalexopoulos (eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd IET International Conference on Intelligent Environments (IE 06), 5-6 July 2006, Athens, IET Press, Stevenage, 2006, pp. 245-250.
  • Friedewald, Michael, Elena Vildjiounaite, Yves Punie, and David Wright, “The Brave New World of Ambient Intelligence: An Analysis of Scenarios regarding Security, Security and Privacy Issues”, in John A. Clark, Richard F. Paige, Fiona A. C. Polack, and Phillip J. Brooke (eds.), Security in Pervasive Computing. Proceedings of the Third International Conference, SPC 2006, York, UK, April 18-21, 2006, Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2006, pp. 119-133.
  • Vildjiounaite, Elena, Petteri Alahuhta, Pasi Ahonen, David Wright, and Michael Friedewald, “Design Guidelines for Analysis and Safeguarding of Privacy Threats in Ubicomp Applications”, in Soraya Kouadri Mostéfaoui, Zakaria Maamar, and George M. Giaglis (eds.), Ubiquitous Computing, Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Ubiquitous Computing, IWUC 2006, In conjunction with ICEIS 2006, Paphos, Cyprus, May 2006., INSTICC Press, Setúbal, Portugal, 2006, pp. 49-61.
  • Friedewald, Michael, and Ralf Lindner, “Ubiquitous Computing: Herausforderungen für Datenschutz und Datensicherheit”, Der Datenschutz-Berater, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2007, pp. 8-10.
  • Friedewald, Michael, and Ralf Lindner, “Datenschutz, Privatsphäre und Identität in intelligenten Umgebungen: Eine Szenarioanalyse”, in Friedemann Mattern (ed.), Die Informatisierung des Alltags: Leben in smarten Umgebungen, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2007, pp. 207-231.
  • Friedewald, Michael, Elena Vildjiounaite, Yves Punie, and David Wright, “Privacy, Identity, and Security in Ambient Intelligence: A Scenario Analysis”, Telematics and Informatics, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2007, pp. 15-29.
  • Lindner, Ralf, and Michael Friedewald, “Gesellschaftliche Herausforderung durch intelligente Umgebungen: Dunkle Szenarien als TA-Werkzeug”, ITA manu:script ITA-07-07, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien, 2007.
  • Wright, David, Serge Gutwirth, and Michael Friedewald, “Shining Light on the Dark Side of Ambient Intelligence”, Foresight: The Journal of Future Studies, Strategic Thinking and Policy, Vol. 9, No. 2, 2007, pp. 46-59.
  • Friedewald, Michael, “Ubiquitous Computing: Ein neues Konzepts der Mensch-Computer-Interaktion und seine Folgen”, in Hans Dieter Hellige (ed.), Mensch-Computer-Interface: Zur Geschichte und Zukunft der Computerbedienung, Transkript Verlag, Bielefeld, 2008, pp. 259-280.
  • Friedewald, Michael, and Ralf Lindner, “Gesellschaftliche Herausforderung durch intelligente Umgebungen”, Technikfolgenabschätzung – Theorie und Praxis, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2008, pp. 78-83.
  • Vildjiounaite, Elena, Tapani Rantakokko, Petteri Alahuhta, Pasi Ahonen, David Wright, and Michael Friedewald, “Privacy Threats in Emerging Ubicomp Applications: Analysis and Safeguarding”, in Soraya Kouadri Mostéfaoui, Zakaria Maamar, and George M. Giaglis (eds.), Advances in Ubiquitous Computing: Future Paradigms and Directions, IGI Global, Hershey, PA, 2008, pp. 320-351.
  • Wright, David, Michael Friedewald, Wim Schreurs, Michiel Verlinden, Serge Gutwirth, Yves Punie, Ioannis Maghiros, Elena Vildjiounaite, and Petteri Alahuhta, “The illusion of security”, Communications of the ACM, Vol. 51, No. 3, 2008, pp. 56-63.
  • Wright, David, “Alternative futures: AmI scenarios and Minority Report”, Futures, Vol. 40, 2008, pp. 473–488.
  • de Hert, Paul, Serge Gutwirth, Anna Moscibroda, David Wright, and Gloria Gonzalez-Fuster, “Legal Safeguards for Privacy and Data Protection in Ambient Intelligence”, Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2009, pp. 435-444.

SWAMI Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence

This project aimed to identify and analyse the social, economic, legal, technological and ethical issues related to identify, privacy and security in Ambient Intelligence (AmI). The partners reviewed existing AmI projects, studies, scenarios and roadmaps to ensure that the SWAMI project captures, as far as possible, the major trends and issues. The partners composed “dark” scenarios, the aim of which was to expose key socio-economic, legal, technological and ethical risks and vulnerabilities related to issues such as identity, privacy and security that may emerge from the deployment of AmI technologies and services, many if not most of which invisible to the public. The partners defined and studied various research and policy options, which could serve as safeguards and privacy-enhancing mechanisms. The aim was to identify mechanisms, which ensure user control, user acceptance and enforceability of policy in an accessible manner, as well as to ensure that all Europeans have real equal rights and opportunities of accessibility to the Ambient Intelligence space. The partners sought to validate their findings through two workshops with other AmI and IST experts before presenting the options to the Commission in a final report. Project results were disseminated widely and continuously throughout the project and were presented at a final, high-level conference.

Status

Completed Project (02/2005 – 07/2006)

Client

6th Framework Programme; European Commission, DG Information Society, Unit H3

Partners

  • Institute for Prospective Technological Studies (IPTS), Joint Research Center, European Commission, Seville
  • Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB), Research Group on Law, Science, Technology & Society, Brussels
  • Technology & Society, Brussels
  • Technical Research Centre of Finland, VTT, Oulu
  • Trilateral Research & Consultancy, London

Publications

Book

  • Wright, David, Serge Gutwirth, Michael Friedewald, Elena Vildjiounaite, and Yves Punie, Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence, Springer, Dordrecht, 2008.

Articles and conference papers

  • Friedewald, Michael, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence: Outline of a research agenda on the European Level”, in Dieter Hutter, and Markus Ullmann (eds.), Security in Pervasive Computing. Proceedings of the second International Conference, SPC 2005, Boppard, Germany, April 6-8, 2005, Springer, Heidelberg, Berlin, 2005, pp. 63-69.
  • Maghiros, Ioannis, Yves Punie, Sabine Delaitre, Paul de Hert, Serge Gutwirth, Wim Schreurs, Anna Agata Moscibroda, Michael Friedewald, Ralf Lindner, David Wright, Elena Vildjiounaite, and Petteri Alahuhta, “Safeguards in a World of Ambient Intelligence”, in Achilles D. Kameas, and Dimitris Papalexopoulos (eds.), Proceedings of the 2nd IET International Conference on Intelligent Environments (IE 06), 5-6 July 2006, Athens, IET Press, Stevenage, 2006, pp. 245-250.
  • Vildjiounaite, Elena, Petteri Alahuhta, Pasi Ahonen, David Wright, and Michael Friedewald, “Design Guidelines for Analysis and Safeguarding of Privacy Threats in Ubicomp Applications”, in Soraya Kouadri Mostéfaoui, Zakaria Maamar, and George M. Giaglis (eds.), Ubiquitous Computing, Proceedings of the 3rd International Workshop on Ubiquitous Computing, IWUC 2006, In conjunction with ICEIS 2006, Paphos, Cyprus, May 2006., INSTICC Press, Setúbal, Portugal, 2006, pp. 49-61.
  • Friedewald, Michael, and Ralf Lindner, “Datenschutz, Privatsphäre und Identität in intelligenten Umgebungen: Eine Szenarioanalyse”, in Friedemann Mattern (ed.), Die Informatisierung des Alltags: Leben in smarten Umgebungen, Springer-Verlag, Berlin, Heidelberg, New York, 2007, pp. 207-231.
  • Friedewald, Michael, and Ralf Lindner, “Ubiquitous Computing: Herausforderungen für Datenschutz und Datensicherheit”, Der Datenschutz-Berater, Vol. 31, No. 2, 2007, pp. 8-10.
  • Friedewald, Michael, Elena Vildjiounaite, Yves Punie, and David Wright, “Privacy, Identity, and Security in Ambient Intelligence: A Scenario Analysis”, Telematics and Informatics, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2007, pp. 15-29.
  • Lindner, Ralf, and Michael Friedewald, “Gesellschaftliche Herausforderung durch intelligente Umgebungen: Dunkle Szenarien als TA-Werkzeug”, ITA manu:script ITA-07-07, Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Wien, 2007.
  • Wright, David, Serge Gutwirth, and Michael Friedewald, “Shining Light on the Dark Side of Ambient Intelligence”, Foresight: The Journal of Future Studies, Strategic Thinking and Policy, Vol. 9, No. 2, 2007, pp. 46-59. http://www.emeraldinsight.com/journals.htm?articleid=1602580&show=abstract
  • Wright, David, “Alternative futures: AmI scenarios and Minority Report”, Futures, Vol. 40, 2008, pp. 473–488.
  • Friedewald, Michael, and Ralf Lindner, “Gesellschaftliche Herausforderung durch intelligente Umgebungen”, Technikfolgenabschätzung – Theorie und Praxis, Vol. 17, No. 1, 2008, pp. 78-83.
  • Wright, David, Michael Friedewald, Wim Schreurs, Michiel Verlinden, Serge Gutwirth, Yves Punie, Ioannis Maghiros, Elena Vildjiounaite, and Petteri Alahuhta, “The illusion of security”, Communications of the ACM, Vol. 51, No. 3, 2008, pp. 56-63.
  • de Hert, Paul, Serge Gutwirth, Anna Moscibroda, David Wright, and Gloria Gonzalez-Fuster, “Legal Safeguards for Privacy and Data Protection in Ambient Intelligence”, Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, Vol. 13, No. 6, 2009, pp. 435-444.
  • Wright, David, “Constructing Dark Scenarios for Privacy Policy Formulation”, in Susanne Giesecke, Patrick Crehan, and Stephan Elkins (eds.), The European Foresight Monitoring Network: Collection of EFMN Briefs, Part 2, Office for Official Publications of the European Communities Luxembourg, 2009, pp. 106-107.

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