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Just published: Smart Technologies – Workshop on Challenges and Trends for Privacy in a Hyper-connected World

Baur-Ahrens, A.; Bieker, F.; Friedewald, M. et al. (2016): Smart Technologies – Workshop on Challenges and Trends for Privacy in a Hyper-connected World. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer, S. 111-128.

In this workshop we addressed what it means to live in a smart world with particular regard to privacy. Together with the audience, we discussed the impacts of smart devices on individuals and society. The workshop was therefore interdisciplinary by design and brought together different perspectives including technology, data protection and law, ethics and regulation. In four presentations, a range of issues, trends and challenges stemming from smart devices in general and smart cars in particular – as one example of an emerging and extensive smart technology – were raised. In the discussion, it became clear that privacy and its implementation are at the core of the relationship between users on the one side and smart appliances as well as the technical systems and companies behind them on the other and that there is an ongoing need to broaden the understanding of privacy in the direction of a social and collective value.

Just published: Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices

Friedewald, M.; van Lieshout, M.; Rung, S. (2016): Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 476), S. 1-18.

The relationship between privacy and security is often but falsely understood as a zero-sum game, whereby more security can only be achieved by sacrifice of privacy. Since this has been proven as too simplistic this chapter explores what factors are influencing people’s perceptions of privacy and security in the context of security-oriented surveillance practices. We are presenting a model showing that structural elements such as trust in the institutions that are implementing and operating surveillance systems are crucial for the acceptability while individual factors such as age, gender or region of living are less important than often assumed.

Just published: „Factors influencing citizens’ attitudes towards surveillance oriented security technologies“

Friedewald, Michael, and Marc van Lieshout, „Factors influencing citizens’ attitudes towards surveillance oriented security technologies„, in Constanze Scherz, Tomáš Michalek, Leonhard Hennen, Lenka Hebáková, Julia Hahn, and Stefanie Seitz (eds.), The Next Horizon of Technology Assessment: Proceedings from the PACITA 2015 Conference in Berlin, Technology Centre ASCR, Prague, 2015, pp. 259-264.

Just published: Privacy and Security Perceptions of European Citizens: A Test of the Trade-off Model

Friedewald, Michael, Marc van Lieshout, Sven Rung, Merel Ooms, and Jelmer Ypma, „Privacy and Security Perceptions of European Citizens: A Test of the Trade-off Model„, in Jan Camenisch, Simone Fischer-Hübner, and Marit Hansen (eds.), Privacy and Identity Management for the Future Internet in the Age of Globalisation: 9th IFIP WG 9.2, 9.5, 9.6/11.7, 11.4, 11.6/SIG 9.2.2 International Summer School, Patras, Greece, September 7-12, 2014, Revised Selected Papers, Springer, Heidelberg, Berlin, 2015, pp. 39-53. DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-18621-4_4

This paper considers the relationship between privacy and security and, in particular, the traditional ”trade-off” paradigm that argues that citizens might be willing to sacrifice some privacy for more security. Academics have long argued against the trade-off paradigm, but these arguments have often fallen on deaf ears. Based on data gathered in a pan-European survey we show that both privacy and security are important to European citizens and that there is no significant correlation between people’s valuation of privacy and security.