Skip to main content

Book on „Security, Privacy and Surveillance“ published

Surveillance, Privacy and Security: Citizens‘ Perspectives (PRIO New Security Studies)

edited by Michael Friedewald , J Peter Burgess , Johann Čas, Rocco Bellanova , Walter Peissl 

Routledge 2017, ISBN978-1138649248, 272 pages

This volume examines the relationship between privacy, surveillance and security, and the alleged privacy-security trade-off, focusing on the citizen’s perspective. It is based on talks given at the joint conference of the PRISMS, SurPRISE and PACT FP7 projects held in Vienna in November 2015.

Recent revelations of mass surveillance programmes clearly demonstrate the ever-increasing capabilities of surveillance technologies. The lack of serious reactions to these activities shows that the political will to implement them appears to be an unbroken trend. The resulting move into a surveillance society is, however, contested for many reasons. Are the resulting infringements of privacy and other human rights compatible with democratic societies? Is security necessarily depending on surveillance? Are there alternative ways to frame security? Is it possible to gain in security by giving up civil liberties, or is it even necessary to do so, and do citizens adopt this trade-off? This volume contributes to a better and deeper understanding of the relation between privacy, surveillance and security, comprising in-depth investigations and studies of the common narrative that more security can only come at the expense of sacrifice of privacy. The book combines theoretical research with a wide range of empirical studies focusing on the citizen’s perspective. It presents empirical research exploring factors and criteria relevant for the assessment of surveillance technologies. The book also deals with the governance of surveillance technologies. New approaches and instruments for the regulation of security technologies and measures are presented, and recommendations for security policies in line with ethics and fundamental rights are discussed.

Apart from the hardcover edition, there is also an e-book that is available via green way open access.

Just published: Smart Technologies – Workshop on Challenges and Trends for Privacy in a Hyper-connected World

Baur-Ahrens, A.; Bieker, F.; Friedewald, M. et al. (2016): Smart Technologies – Workshop on Challenges and Trends for Privacy in a Hyper-connected World. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer, S. 111-128.

In this workshop we addressed what it means to live in a smart world with particular regard to privacy. Together with the audience, we discussed the impacts of smart devices on individuals and society. The workshop was therefore interdisciplinary by design and brought together different perspectives including technology, data protection and law, ethics and regulation. In four presentations, a range of issues, trends and challenges stemming from smart devices in general and smart cars in particular – as one example of an emerging and extensive smart technology – were raised. In the discussion, it became clear that privacy and its implementation are at the core of the relationship between users on the one side and smart appliances as well as the technical systems and companies behind them on the other and that there is an ongoing need to broaden the understanding of privacy in the direction of a social and collective value.

Just published: Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices

Friedewald, M.; van Lieshout, M.; Rung, S. (2016): Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 476), S. 1-18.

The relationship between privacy and security is often but falsely understood as a zero-sum game, whereby more security can only be achieved by sacrifice of privacy. Since this has been proven as too simplistic this chapter explores what factors are influencing people’s perceptions of privacy and security in the context of security-oriented surveillance practices. We are presenting a model showing that structural elements such as trust in the institutions that are implementing and operating surveillance systems are crucial for the acceptability while individual factors such as age, gender or region of living are less important than often assumed.

The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) survey data now publicly available

Now available in GESIS – Data Archive for the Social Sciences: Survey  Data from the project “The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making” under number ZA6296.

Primary researchers of this study are:
Szekely, Iván, Eötvös Károly Policy Institute
Raab, Charles, University Edinburgh
van der Ploeg, Irma, University Maastricht
Gutwirth, Serge, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
Wright, David, Trilateral Research Ltd.
van Lieshout, Marc, Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research
Skinner, Gideon, Ipsos MORI
Friedewald, Michael, Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

Dataset: 1.0.0 (01.07.2016) doi:10.4232/1.12559

Access class: A – Data and documents are released for academic research and teaching.

More information is available at the data catalogue: study description.

Suggested citation:

Friedewald, Michael; Skinner, Gideon; van Lieshout, Marc; Wright, David; Gutwirth, Serge; van der Ploeg, Irma; Raab, Charles; Szekely, Iván (2016): The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making. GESIS Datenarchiv, Köln. ZA6296 Datenfile Version 1.0.0, doi:10.4232/1.12559

The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) Umfragedaten jetzt öffentlich verfügbar

Neu im GESIS – Datenarchiv für Sozialwissenschaften verfügbar sind die Daten der Studie „The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making“ unter der Nummer ZA6296.

Primärforscher dieser Studie sind:
Szekely, Iván, Eötvös Károly Policy Institute
Raab, Charles, University Edinburgh
van der Ploeg, Irma, University Maastricht
Gutwirth, Serge, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
Wright, David, Trilateral Research Ltd.
van Lieshout, Marc, Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research
Skinner, Gideon, Ipsos MORI
Friedewald, Michael, Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

Datensatz: 1.0.0 (01.07.2016) doi:10.4232/1.12559

Zugangsklasse: A – Daten und Dokumente sind für die akademische Forschung und Lehre freigegeben.

Weitere Informationen im Datenbestandskatalog: Studienbeschreibung.

Suggested citation:

Friedewald, Michael; Skinner, Gideon; van Lieshout, Marc; Wright, David; Gutwirth, Serge; van der Ploeg, Irma; Raab, Charles; Szekely, Iván (2016): The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making. GESIS Datenarchiv, Köln. ZA6296 Datenfile Version 1.0.0, doi:10.4232/1.12559

Policy Paper zur EU-Datenschutz-Grundverordnung: Datenschutz bleibt weitgehend Aufgabe der Mitgliedsstaaten

Am 4. Mai 2016 wurde die neue Europäische Datenschutz-Grundverordnung verkündet, die den Datenschutz in der EU stärken soll. Das vom Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung ISI koordinierte Forum Privatheit veröffentlicht zu diesem Anlass ein neues Policy Paper, das sich mit der Ausgestaltung der Grundverordnung befasst. Darin geben die Autoren eine Einschätzung ab, ob die zentralen Ziele einer Harmonisierung und Modernisierung des europäischen Datenschutzrechts sowie eine Wettbewerbsangleichung erreicht werden.

Mit der Europäischen Datenschutz-Grundverordnung ist bei Datenschützern, Aufsichtsbehörden und Bürgerinnen und Bürgern gleichermaßen die Hoffnung nach einer Stärkung des Datenschutzes in der EU verbunden. Insbesondere drei große Ziele sind an die Grundverordnung geknüpft: Diese soll zum einen zu einer Harmonisierung bzw. zu einheitlich geltenden Datenschutzregeln in Europa führen. Darüber hinaus soll mit ihr das Datenschutzrecht modernisiert und an neue technologische Entwicklungen angepasst werden. Ein drittes Ziel besteht in einer Wettbewerbsangleichung, also einer Stärkung des EU-Binnenmarkts durch vereinheitliche Datenschutz-Regelungen.

Im neuen Policy Paper „Die neue Datenschutz-Grundverordnung – Ist das Datenschutzrecht nun für heutige Herausforderungen gerüstet?“ nehmen die Wissenschaftlerinnen und Wissenschaftler des Forum Privatheit zur Grundverordnung Stellung. In Bezug auf eine Vereinheitlichung der Datenschutz-Regelungen in Europa benennt Prof. Dr. Alexander Roßnagel, Mitautor des Policy Papers und Leiter des Fachgebiets Öffentliches Recht an der Universität Kassel, zwei hierfür hinderliche Aspekte: „Die Datenschutz-Grundverordnung beinhaltet 70 Öffnungsklauseln, die bei der Zulässigkeit der Datenverarbeitung – insbesondere im gesamten öffentlichen Bereich –, den Betroffenenrechten, Erlaubnistatbeständen, dem Beschäftigungsdatenschutz oder der Meinungs- und Informationsfreiheit Regelungen an die EU-Mitgliedsstaaten überträgt. Hinzu kommt, dass diese Regelungen sehr abstrakt bleiben und von den Mitgliedsstaaten auf Basis ihrer eigenen Rechtstradition ausgelegt werden.“ Eine Harmonisierung des Datenschutzrechts wird so laut Roßnagel verhindert und stattdessen Rechtsunsicherheit geschaffen.

Ziel einer Wettbewerbsangleichung in Europa wird verfehlt

Ein zweites zentrales Ziel der Verordnung besteht in einer Stärkung des europäischen Binnenmarktes durch vereinheitliche Datenschutz-Regelungen. Das Policy Paper gelangt zu dem Schluss, dass auch dieses Vorhaben nicht erfüllt wird. Der Grund dafür liegt ebenfalls an möglichen unterschiedlichen Interpretationen der abstrakten Datenschutz-Regelungen durch die Mitgliedsstaaten. Allerdings kann ein Datenschutz-Ausschuss auf europäischer Ebene hier künftig eine bestimmte Auslegung der Grundverordnung festlegen – für Gerichte sind diese Beschlüsse aber nicht verbindlich, sondern sie stellen lediglich Empfehlungen dar.

Das dritte Ziel einer Modernisierung des Datenschutzrechts wird von der Grundverordnung teilweise erreicht. Einen zentralen Fortschritt sehen die Autoren des Policy Papers im „Marktortprinzip“: Demnach soll nicht mehr der Ort der Datenverarbeitung für die Anwendung des Datenschutzrechts entscheidend sein, sondern die Frage, ob Daten von sich in der EU aufhaltenden Personen verarbeitet werden. Außerdem sieht die Verordnung empfindliche Sanktionen bei Nichtbeachtung des Datenschutzes vor, die bis zu vier Prozent des globalen Jahresumsatzes von Unternehmen ausmachen können. Dr. Michael Friedewald, der das Forum Privatheit am Fraunhofer ISI koordiniert und ebenfalls am Policy Paper mitgewirkt hat, weist auf weitere Verbesserungen hin: „Zum Beispiel bieten Datenschutz-Folgenabschätzungen künftig die Möglichkeit, die vorwiegend durch datenverarbeitende Technologien entstehenden Risiken für den Datenschutz abzuschätzen und diese gering zu halten.“

Risikoneutralität ist ein Defizit der neuen Grundverordnung

Neben diesen positiven Aspekten weist das Policy Paper auch auf Schwachstellen hin, die einer Modernisierung des Datenschutzrechts im Wege stehen. So dürfen personenbezogene Daten weiterhin über Umwege erhoben werden. Zudem reicht in Zukunft ein berechtigtes Interesse eines Dritten – etwa eines Unternehmens – aus, um persönliche Daten zu verarbeiten. Das größte Manko der Verordnung ist aber ihre Risikoneutralität: Sie enthält keine einzige spezifische Regelung zu den großen Herausforderungen moderner Informationstechniken wie Big Data, Ubiquitous Computing, Cloud Computing oder vielen anderen Grundrechtrisiken. Auch beinhaltet die Grundverordnung Transparenzpflichten, diese sind jedoch durch Grundrechte, Geschäftsgeheimnisse oder Urheberrechte weitgehend eingeschränkt.

Angesichts der vielen Schwachstellen der Datenschutz-Grundverordnung fällt das Fazit im Policy Paper eindeutig aus: Eine Harmonisierung und Wettbewerbsangleichung des EU-Datenschutzrechts wird gar nicht, eine Modernisierung nur teilweise erreicht. Die Datenschutz-Regelungen der Mitgliedsstaaten haben zudem weiter Bestand. Insgesamt wurden damit viele Chancen zur Stärkung des Datenschutzes in der EU verpasst. Dennoch gibt es wie im Falle des „Marktortprinzips“ auch Fortschritte. Bevor die Grundverordnung in den kommenden zwei Jahren allerdings in Kraft treten kann, sind die Mitgliedstaaten, Aufsichtsbehörden, Verbände, der Europäische Datenschutz-Ausschuss sowie der europäische Gesetzgeber gefragt, so schnell wie möglich ergänzende rechtssichere und risikoadäquate Regelungen zu treffen.


Im vom BMBF geförderten Forum Privatheit setzen sich nationale und internationale Experten interdisziplinär mit Fragestellungen zum Schutz der Privatheit auseinander. Das Projekt wird vom Fraunhofer ISI koordiniert, Partner sind das Fraunhofer SIT, die Universität Hohenheim, die Universität Kassel, die Eberhard Karls Universität Tübingen, das Unabhängige Landeszentrum für Datenschutz Schleswig-Holstein sowie die Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München. Die Forschungsergebnisse des Forums Privatheit fließen dabei nicht nur in den wissenschaftlichen Diskurs ein, sondern sollen auch Bürgerinnen und Bürger über Fragen des Privatheitsschutzes informieren.

Forthcoming book: Surveillance, Privacy and Security – Citizens’ Perspectives

This volume examines the relationship between privacy, surveillance and security, and the alleged privacy-security trade-off, combining theoretical research with empirical research focusing on the citizen’s perspective.

Recent revelations of mass surveillance programmes clearly demonstrate the ever-increasing capabilities of surveillance technologies. The resulting move into a surveillance society is, however, contested for many reasons. Is it possible to gain in security by giving up civil liberties, or is it even necessary to do so? Do citizens adopt this trade-off and, if yes, are they willing to enter into this trade? The book presents quantitative and qualitative data gained from empirical research encompasses representative European-wide opinion surveys, the involvement of citizens in large-scale participatory technology assessment studies as well as studies on specific surveillance technologies. The contributions provide insights into the factors and criteria relevant for the assessment of surveillance technologies, with a specific focus on the attitudes and the reasoning of citizens vis-à-vis the legitimacy and necessity of these technologies. A second core theme is the governance of surveillance technologies. New approaches and instruments for the regulation of security technologies and measures are presented, and recommendations for security policies in line with ethics and fundamental rights are discussed.

The book presents the results of a number of large scale surveys in which citizens’ perceptions on privacy and security are investigated. A second feature of this book is that, contrary to most existing books, it makes citizens the main focus of investigation. What is their position in the discourse around surveillance and security? How are they involved in the development of surveillance/security practices? How do they feel about current surveillance technologies and practices and how is their behaviour determined?

This book will be of much interest to students of surveillance studies, critical security studies, intelligence studies, EU politics and IR in general.

Surveillance, Privacy and Security – Citizens’ Perspectives