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CPDP Panel des Forum Privatheit zu „Conversational Agents“

Das Forum Privatheit und selbstbestimmtes Leben in der digitalen Welt hat bei der jährlichen Konferenz „Computer, Privacy and Data Protection“ (CPDP 2017) eine Paneldiskussion zum Thema „CONVERSATIONAL AGENTS: A THREAT TO PRIVACY?“ organisiert.

Vortragende waren Hamza Harkous, École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (CH), Ewa Luger, Design Informatics Group, University of Edinburgh (UK), Astrid Rosenthal-van der Pütten, University of Duisburg-Essen (DE), Michael Schlüter, GfK (UK), Moderator:  Max Braun, University of Hohenheim (DE)

 

„Seven types of Privacy“ discussed at CPDP 2017

At this year’s Conference „Computers, Privacy and Data Protection“ (CPDP 2017), I discussed typologies of privacy in a panel organised by Bart-Japp Koops.

Revisited work done in the PRESCIENT project some time ago and made clear that typologies are not an end in themselves but are useful instruments to structure the thinking about social phenomena and therefore need to be updated regularly.

VideoPresentation slides (2017) and Original Paper authored together with Rachel Finn and David Wright (2013)

 

e-Sides project is starting officially in January 2017

The e-Sides-project, a coordination and support action in the field of privacy-preserving big data technologies is starting officially on 19 January 2017 with a kick-off-meeting in Luxembourg. The kick-off meeting is co-located with the Information and Networking Days on Horizon 2020 Big Data PPP’s which is taking place on 17 and 18 January 2017. e-Sides will complement the research on privacy-preserving big data technologies, by analysing, mapping and clearly identifying the main societal and ethical challenges emerging from the adoption of big data technologies, conforming to the principles of responsible research and innovation; setting up and organizing a sustainable dialogue between industry, research and social actors, as well as networking with the main Research and Innovation Actions and Large Scale Pilots and other framework programme projects interested in these issues.

Just published: Smart Technologies – Workshop on Challenges and Trends for Privacy in a Hyper-connected World

Baur-Ahrens, A.; Bieker, F.; Friedewald, M. et al. (2016): Smart Technologies – Workshop on Challenges and Trends for Privacy in a Hyper-connected World. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer, S. 111-128.

In this workshop we addressed what it means to live in a smart world with particular regard to privacy. Together with the audience, we discussed the impacts of smart devices on individuals and society. The workshop was therefore interdisciplinary by design and brought together different perspectives including technology, data protection and law, ethics and regulation. In four presentations, a range of issues, trends and challenges stemming from smart devices in general and smart cars in particular – as one example of an emerging and extensive smart technology – were raised. In the discussion, it became clear that privacy and its implementation are at the core of the relationship between users on the one side and smart appliances as well as the technical systems and companies behind them on the other and that there is an ongoing need to broaden the understanding of privacy in the direction of a social and collective value.

Just published: Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices

Friedewald, M.; van Lieshout, M.; Rung, S. (2016): Modelling the relationship between privacy and security perceptions and the acceptance of surveillance practices. In: Aspinall, D.; Camenisch, J. et al. (Hrsg.): Privacy and Identity 2015, IFIP AICT, vol. 476. Cham: Springer (IFIP Advances in Information and Communication Technology, 476), S. 1-18.

The relationship between privacy and security is often but falsely understood as a zero-sum game, whereby more security can only be achieved by sacrifice of privacy. Since this has been proven as too simplistic this chapter explores what factors are influencing people’s perceptions of privacy and security in the context of security-oriented surveillance practices. We are presenting a model showing that structural elements such as trust in the institutions that are implementing and operating surveillance systems are crucial for the acceptability while individual factors such as age, gender or region of living are less important than often assumed.

The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) survey data now publicly available

Now available in GESIS – Data Archive for the Social Sciences: Survey  Data from the project “The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making” under number ZA6296.

Primary researchers of this study are:
Szekely, Iván, Eötvös Károly Policy Institute
Raab, Charles, University Edinburgh
van der Ploeg, Irma, University Maastricht
Gutwirth, Serge, Vrije Universiteit Brussels
Wright, David, Trilateral Research Ltd.
van Lieshout, Marc, Dutch Organization for Applied Scientific Research
Skinner, Gideon, Ipsos MORI
Friedewald, Michael, Fraunhofer-Institut für System- und Innovationsforschung (ISI)

Dataset: 1.0.0 (01.07.2016) doi:10.4232/1.12559

Access class: A – Data and documents are released for academic research and teaching.

More information is available at the data catalogue: study description.

Suggested citation:

Friedewald, Michael; Skinner, Gideon; van Lieshout, Marc; Wright, David; Gutwirth, Serge; van der Ploeg, Irma; Raab, Charles; Szekely, Iván (2016): The Privacy and Security Mirrors (PRISMS) – Towards a European Framework For Integrated Decision Making. GESIS Datenarchiv, Köln. ZA6296 Datenfile Version 1.0.0, doi:10.4232/1.12559